www.dartwildlife.org

Hwange Leopard Project

Methodology


SPOOR (FOOTPRINT) COUNT TRANSECTS


Where spoor/footprints/tracks of leopard (and competitive carnivores) are counted along specific roads and trails in designated research areas to estimate population densities.






























LEOPARD SIGHTINGS REPORTS


In addition to DART's own sightings, DART also receive  valuable sightings information from local and overseas tourists, guides, researchers, rangers and other visitors to Hwange National Park
































Where fixed flash and infra–red camera traps are used to automatically ‘capture’ photographs of leopards in the study area to assess population density and identify how many males, females, adults and young are in an area. Cameras are set up to photograph both sides of the animals as every leopard has unique natural markings and these can be used to individually identify, age and sex individual animals to determine social groupings (e.g. number of cubs accompanying females) in each study area. 

D.A.R.T. works on setting up and moving cameras to best record leopard in the field and then identifies, classifies and updates photographic data collected on these leopards.















Where VHF, GPS & Satellite-tracking telemetry is being used to estimate home-range size and seasonal territorial changes; leopard social interactions; territorial conflicts and competitive carnivore interactions; preferred prey species; diet composition; feeding habits and habitat preferences.

A sample of individual leopards are captured and fitted with GPS Satellite Tracking Collars in various study areas. D.A.R.T. uses radio tracking receivers and aerials to locate leopard and obtain visual sightings.


































In addition GPS collar positions indicate the location of various kill sites that are investigated to collect faecal and hair follicle samples to identify diet composition and prey species preference



Camera trap and GPS location
Measuring leopard footprint

CAMERA TRAPPING

TRACKING COLLARS & SATELLITE MONITORING

KILL SITES INVESTIGATION

Tracking in the African bush
Satellite and VHF collar for monitoring African wild animals
National Park Ranger setting up a camera trap
Monitoring wildlife with telemetry
Paul de Montille and Innocent Maketo setting a tracking collar to a lfemale leopard
Footprint transect from a vehicle
Leopard footprints in the sand
DART_Hwnage Leopard Project poster
Sighting sheet for Hwange Leopard Project
Baboon killed by a male leopard
Duiker prey put in atree by a female leopard in Hwange National Park

Duiker

Baboon